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The Tate Modern’s first ever solo exhibition of Pablo Picasso focuses solely on a single year in the artist’s life, exploring Picasso’s work throughout 1932. In a year which saw the launch of a major retrospective of his work, Picasso was concerned over his continuing relevance in the art world moving forward.


The Dream, Pablo Picasso 1932. Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2018

The Dream, Pablo Picasso 1932. Private Collection © Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2018


Featuring over 100 paintings, sculptures and drawings alongside family photographs and other rare insights into the artist’s private self, the exhibition promises that visitors will “see Picasso as never before”. During what proved to be an intensely creative year for the artist, Picasso was living and working in Paris, painting from a studio above his apartment near the Champs Élysées.

The show is dominated by paintings featuring Picasso’s lover Marie-Thérèse Walter, whom he met in 1927. In Picasso’s works, Walter is often depicted reclining nude, with a signature lilac hue running throughout. One of the exhibition’s highlights is the display of three paintings featuring Walter, which have been shown together for the first time since they were created over a period of five days in March 1932.

The decision to focus sharply on a specific, pivotal year in Picasso’s life allows the show to hone in on Picasso’s mood during this time. The underlying anxiety in his work, and thoughts of life, death and love are evident throughout, providing unprecedented insight into the personal world of Picasso. 


Girl Before a Mirror, Pablo Picasso 1932 - via the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Simon Guggenheim in 1937  © Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2018

Girl Before a Mirror, Pablo Picasso 1932 - via the Museum of Modern Art, New York. Gift of Mrs. Simon Guggenheim in 1937  © Succession Picasso/DACS London, 2018


Picasso 1932 — Love, Fame, Tragedy is at Tate Modern until September 9; tate.org.uk

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